PUSH Fitness & Rehabiliation
Welcome !! PUSH-as-Rx ®™ is leading the field with laser focus supporting our youth sport programs. The PUSH-as-Rx ®™ System is a sport specific athletic program designed by a strength-agility coach and physiology doctor with a combined 40 years of experience working with extreme athletes. At its core, the program is the multidisciplinary study of reactive agility, body mechanics and extreme motion dynamics. Through continuous and detailed assessments of the athletes in motion and while under direct supervised stress loads, a clear quantitative picture of body dynamics emerges. Exposure to the biomechanical vulnerabilities are presented to our team. Immediately, we adjust our methods for our athletes in order to optimize performance. This highly adaptive system with continual dynamic adjustments has helped many of our athletes come back faster, stronger, and ready post injury while safely minimizing recovery times. Results demonstrate clear improved agility, speed, decreased reaction time with greatly improved postural-torque mechanics. PUSH-as-Rx ®™ offers specialized extreme performance enhancements to our athletes no matter the age.

Low Back Gluteal Strengthening

Today, more than ever, individuals are less physically active and sitting down for more extended periods causing the gluteus muscles to be used less and weaken. Weak, inactive, or tightening glutes can cause instability in the lower spine, the hips, and the pelvis to shift out of alignment. This leads to low back and buttock pain. The pain is constantly dull, aching, pulsating, then when moving, getting up, it throbs and stings. Gluteal strengthening exercises can strengthen the muscles and alleviate the pain.

Low Back Gluteal Strengthening

Gluteal Strengthening

Every individual has a unique physiology. The body develops asymmetrically as the individual favors one side or area of the body over another. This can cause imbalances in the muscular system, leading to awkward positioning that causes pain. The muscle groups that support the lower back consist of the:

  • Core muscles
  • The gluteal muscle group includes:
  • Gluteus Maximus
  • Gluteus medius
  • Gluteus minimus
  • Pelvis muscles
  • Hamstrings
  • Quadriceps

In some cases, the development or lack of level of an individual’s upper back strength can also affect the amount of strain on the lower back.

Gluteal Strengthening Difference

Many joints connect in this area that can have functional problems. The muscles within the lower back need:

  • Exercise
  • Rest
  • Recovery time
  • To be stretched
  • Mobility training – example, foam rolling

Stretch Out

Stretching allows the body to enhance the limits of its flexibility and mobility. Most of the stretches are involve the hip joint, as this is one of the most effective ways to loosen the gluteal regions. It’s essential to warm the muscles slightly with a light activity while stretching them to elongate naturally.

Seated Figure 4 Stretch

  • Sitting in a chair.
  • Cross the right leg over the left.
  • With the right ankle resting on the left knee.
  • It should resemble the number 4.
  • Bend forward at the hip, placing slight pressure onto the left leg.
  • Hold this stretch for ten-twenty seconds.
  • Stretch the other side.
  • Placing the left foot on the right knee.
  • Repeat this three times.

Downward Dog

This yoga pose engages all the muscles along the back. With the glutes at the top in this position, it forces them to activate, allowing them to stretch fully.

  • Hold this pose and focus the attention on the glutes.
  • Arch the back slightly.
  • Feel the stretch in the seat of the glutes.
  • Hold for 30 seconds.

Exercises

Glute Bridge

  • Lay on the back with feet flat on the floor.
  • Knees bent.
  • Rear-end resting on the ground.
  • Engage the glutes.
  • Push the rear-end up to form a bridge.
  • Hold for 60 seconds.
  • Repeat three times.

Swiss Exercise Stability Ball Wall Squat

Squats naturally engage the glutes. This is a variation on a squat that focuses on developing gluteal strength.

  • Stand with the back facing the wall.
  • Place a Swiss stability ball between the wall and the back.
  • Lean back into the ball for balance.
  • Lower the torso until the knees reach 90 degrees.
  • Return to standing.
  • Repeat for ten reps.
  • Do three sets.

Body Composition


Analysis An Effective Tool

Opportunities to increase physical activity lead individuals in a positive direction. The most common reason for reducing and stopping healthy changes is a lack of motivation and feedback. Strategies that provide immediate feedback are essential to:

  • Monitor progress for establishing a baseline.
  • Set appropriate and attainable goals.
  • Track changes over time.
  • Ensure success.

Monitoring changes with a simple weight scale or Body Mass Index calculator provides limited ability to accurately track changes that only highlight weight changes and not track progress in muscle gain or fat loss. In less than 45 seconds, the InBody Test provides doctors, trainers, and physical therapists with easy-to-understand, accurate and objective measurements to evaluate body composition that includes:

  • Assessing muscle distribution.
  • Target areas weakened by condition or injury.
  • Identify muscle and fat imbalances in each area of the body.
  • Monitor changes to determine the efficacy of the treatment plan, exercise program, and diet plan to ensure long-term success.
References

Akuthota, Venu et al. “Core stability exercise principles.” Current sports medicine reports vol. 7,1 (2008): 39-44. doi:10.1097/01.CSMR.0000308663.13278.69

Distefano, Lindsay J et al. “Gluteal muscle activation during common therapeutic exercises.” The Journal of orthopedic and sports physical therapy vol. 39,7 (2009): 532-40. doi:10.2519/jospt.2009.2796

Glaviano, Neal R et al. “Gluteal muscle inhibition: Consequences of patellofemoral pain?.” Medical hypotheses vol. 126 (2019): 9-14. doi:10.1016/j.mehy.2019.02.046

Jeong, Ui-Cheol et al. “The effects of gluteus muscle strengthening exercise and lumbar stabilization exercise on lumbar muscle strength and balance in chronic low back pain patients.” Journal of physical therapy science vol. 27,12 (2015): 3813-6. doi:10.1589/jpts.27.3813

Macadam, Paul et al. “AN EXAMINATION OF THE GLUTEAL MUSCLE ACTIVITY ASSOCIATED WITH DYNAMIC HIP ABDUCTION AND HIP EXTERNAL ROTATION EXERCISE: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW.” International Journal of sports physical therapy vol. 10,5 (2015): 573-91.

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Professional Scope of Practice *

The information herein on "Low Back Gluteal Strengthening" is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own health care decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified health care professional.

Our information scope is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, sensitive health issues, functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system.

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We understand that we cover matters that require an additional explanation of how it may assist in a particular care plan or treatment protocol; therefore, to further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

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Blessings

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACP, CCST, IFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*